What Happened To Islam’s Environmentally Friendly Architecture?

My latests musing on why so Muslim countries have abandoned Islam’s simple and sustainable architecture in favour of brash Gulf-style monstrosities. Here’s a snippet:

From luxury architecture in Mecca to the blinged-out buildings of Dubai, it seems that Islamic architecture is all about opulence and grandeur. The bigger and the more lavish- the better but it hasn’t always been like this. In the past, Islamic architecture relied on natural materials and some of the most iconic Islamic buildings were ones of simplicity and modesty– think the Kaaba in Mecca. Mud was something that was heartily used and architecture sought to reflect the environment rather than to outshine it…

Full article ‘What Happened to Islam’s Environmentally Friendly Architecture‘ at Green Prophet.

 

The Architecture of Mud in the Muslim World

Mud buildings have withstood the test of time; will they populate our futures too?

Think of Islamic mud structures and more than likely the iconic Great Mosque of Djenne in Mali will come to mind. The largest mud brick building in the world, the mosque is considered to be amongst the greatest achievement of Sudano-Swahelian architecture and one of the most famous landmarks of Africa.

But it’s not only Africa that boasts impressive (and sustainable) mud structures, the Middle East is home to some of the most stunning mud buildings in the world. From the ‘Manhattan of the Desert’ in Yemen to the Bam citadel of Iran, these mud structures show that there’s more to Muslim architecture than Mecca and Masdar. More

A World of Green Muslims

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